Best gay blog. Towleroad Wins Award

DOMA Hub



04/19/2007


WATCH: New IRS Video Gives Tips To Same-Sex Couples On How To File Their Taxes

Irs

As previously reported, in the wake of Article 3 of DOMA being defeated before the US Supreme Court, the US Treasury Department announced that it would allow same-sex couples to file their taxes jointly with the IRS regardless of whether the state in which they currently reside recognizes their unions as legal. Today, the IRS released an informational video providing tips to same-sex couples who, for the first time ever, can file jointly:

"From now on we will treat same sex spouses as married for all federal tax purposes. This change applies as long as you got married in a location that recognizes same sex marriages. Either in the United States or another part of the world. It doesn't matter wether you were living there at the time you were married and it doesn't matter where you live there now. This change applies to all federal tax previsions where marriage is a factor. Such as determining filing status, claiming personal and dependency exemptions, taking the standard deduction,receiving employee benefits, contributing to an IRA and claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit or Child Tax credit. Among other things, it means that generally speaking you now need to file your Federal income tax return either as married filing jointly or married filing separately. You don't need to amend your returns from the previous years but, you may want to by filing form 1040X."

The video joins hundred of other instructional videos the IRS has posted online that covers a wide array of topics.

Gay couples, listen up, AFTER THE JUMP…

Continue reading "WATCH: New IRS Video Gives Tips To Same-Sex Couples On How To File Their Taxes" »


Federal Appeals Court: Lawyers Cannot Exclude Jurors Because They are Gay

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that lawyers cannot exclude potential jurors from a jury because they are gay, Buzzfeed reports:

JuryThe 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, in a unanimous decision, held that discrimination based on sexual orientation is subject to heightened scrutiny — a decision the court concluded has been made in action, though not in word, by the Supreme Court itself.

In describing the reason for the new standard, Judge Stephen Reinhardt examined the Supreme Court’s June decision in Edith Windsor’s case challenging the Defense of Marriage Act. Writing for the three-judge panel, Reinhardt wrote:

Windsor review is not rational basis review. In its words and its deed, Windsor established a level of scrutiny for classifications based on sexual orientation that is unquestionably higher than rational basis review. In other words, Windsor requires that heightened scrutiny be applied to equal protection claims involving sexual orientation.

Back in September, our legal editor Ari Ezra Waldman discussed the case, Glaxo v. Abbott:

The case may not initially strike us as the stuff of social justice: two multibillion dollar companies fighting over potentially hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue while paying multimillion dollar law firms millions of dollars to do it. But in the blink of an eye, the lawyers went from talking about "unfair competition" to talking about "antigay discrimination."

The case revolves around the price of an HIV drug and whether one company's decision to quadruple the drug's price violates unfair competition laws. At jury selection time, one of the attorneys used his right to exclude certain members from the jury pool to, ostensibly, exclude a gay person. We don't know for sure that this is what happened; these are allegations and proof is always hard to come by in these circumstances. But if the allegations are true, the act is troubling, at best: the lawyer was suggesting that a gay person cannot be impartial in a case involving an AIDS drug.

The case now asks: Can a person be excluded from a jury simply because of his or her sexual orientation?


JibJab's Annual 'Year in Review' for 2013 Includes DOMA Repeal: VIDEO

Screen Shot 2013-12-23 at 8.47.28 AM

As the end of the year approaches, JibJab looks back on all the memorable moments and characters of 2013, including Miley Cyrus, the Harlem Shake, the repeal of DOMA, and Carlos Danger (aka Anthony Weiner)

Check it out, AFTER THE JUMP...

Screen Shot 2013-12-23 at 8.46.39 AM

Continue reading "JibJab's Annual 'Year in Review' for 2013 Includes DOMA Repeal: VIDEO" »


Social Security Administration Initiates Processing of Widow and Widower Benefits to Surviving Gay Spouses

Statement of Carolyn W. Colvin, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, released the following statement this morning:

Ssa"I am pleased to announce that, effective today, Social Security is processing some widow’s and widower’s claims by surviving members of same-sex marriages and paying benefits where they are due. In addition, we are able to pay some one-time lump sum death benefit claims to surviving same-sex spouses. As I stated shortly after the Supreme Court decision on Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, our goal is to treat all Americans with dignity and respect.

We ask for continued patience from the public as we work closely with the Department of Justice to develop policies that are legally sound so we can process claims.

If you believe you may be eligible for Social Security, I encourage you to apply now to protect against the loss of any potential benefits. We will process claims as soon as additional instructions become finalized."

Learn more here.


Edie Windsor is a Finalist for TIME 'Person of the Year'

Windsor

TIME managing editor Nancy Gibbs has named the shortlist for the magazine's annual 'Person of the Year' issue, and it includes DOMA plaintiff  and SCOTUS victor Edie Windsor.

TimeBashar Assad, President of Syria
Jeff Bezos, Amazon Founder
Ted Cruz, Texas Senator
Miley Cyrus, Singer
Pope Francis, Leader of the Catholic Church
Barack Obama, President of the United States
Hassan Rouhani, President of Iran
Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services
Edward Snowden, N.S.A. Leaker
Edith Windsor, Gay rights activist

President Obama took the title last year.


Marriage Equality Comes to Hawaii: #TBT and 20 Years of Marriage History

By ARI EZRA WALDMAN

It's appropriate that today is #tbt (Throw-back Thursday) because this week, marriage equality came to Hawai'i, the state where it all began, where the this long (and increasingly successful) fight for the freedom to marry we are in right now started.

BaehrOf course, that's not entirely true. The fight for the freedom to marry for the LGBT community began decades and decades ago, in small living rooms in New York and secret coffee shops in San Francisco and in the minds of a few forward-thinking law students. In the late 1960s, a gay couple asked for a marriage license in Minnesota; the Minnesota Supreme Court said no. The U.S. Supreme Court had no objection. That was a case called Baker v. Nelson and it ended in 1971, over 40 years ago! Jack Baker's and Michael McConnell's losing effort was the first salvo in the first generation of marriage cases.

The current generation of marriage cases began in Hawai'i when three same-sex couples, including Ninia Baehr and Genora Dancel (pictured, right), asked the Hawai'i Department of Health for a marriage license, arguing that they met every state requirement for marriage except for the mere fact that each person loved someone of the same sex.

What happened next was remarkable.

Follow me AFTER THE JUMP to get the rest of the story and see how what happened in Hawai'i brought us to where we are today.

Continue reading "Marriage Equality Comes to Hawaii: #TBT and 20 Years of Marriage History" »


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged